All posts tagged inspirational

4 Actions To Help You Move On & Let Go

Each and every day brings new situations… some positive and unfortunately some negative. What determines the reputation of our character is how we handle these situations. We can either gracefully let go and move on from the negative experiences or dwell on them… Below are 4 actions to help you gracefully let go:



This is actually not related to blogging or publishing at all. Often a difficult relationship is the last thing we should write about and then publish on — or, at least, we need to get some space so that we’re making sure it’s helpful and not just emotional vomit purged out into the world without purpose. Regardless, journaling and writing about an event we’re having trouble letting go of has definitely helped me figure out why exactly I’m so hurt and crippled — and then I’m more able to care for my emotions without that aforementioned wallowing.

Talk About it.

There’s a difference between talking a wound into the ground and dwelling on it–and treating our spouse like an unpaid therapist — and talking about a feeling in order to get in touch with it and then leave it in the past. (And, by all means, do see a licensed therapist if need be.)


I practiced yoga the other day after feeling hung up on a conversation. This combination of deep, steady, rhythmic breathing, with moving and stretching and yawning my body open — while also strengthening — reminds me that I’m supple and pliable. It’s reinvigorating to be reminded of how capable I am of bending, and how strong I am when I was initially feeling weak.

While I might not leave my yoga mat a perfectly different human being than I was when I hopped on, I am absolutely better equipped to deal with life, and to move forward one breath at a time.

Spending time with those I love.

And, at the end of the day, we deal with people in our lives outside of the people that we are able to choose, and who we enjoy spending time with. Taking one sincere look at my children, and smiling into their eyes, and holding them, and cuddling my husband, and laughing with him over a silly movie after the kids have gone to bed — these types of simple, positive experiences are always reminders of who and what matter in my life.



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A Quick Beginner’s Guide To Finance and Savings

Mortgage rates, 401(k), IRA, credit scores, yikes! So many questions with so many scenarios. Even with a college degree, these concepts that force us into adulthood can seem puzzling. THANK GOODNESS for Mathew Zeitlin, Buzzfeed News Reporter, for simplifying these concepts and giving advice for grabbing adulthood by the horns!



What is the difference between a 401(k) and an IRA? Is one better than the other?

The main difference between a 401(k) and an IRA is who administers it. Your employer can run a 401(k) plan that you choose to sign up for, while an IRA is managed individually.

With 401(k) plans, you can contribute up to $17,500 in pre-tax income to your 401(k) and your employer can match your contributions. This is as close to free money as you can get and is by far the best deal in personal finance. Income on a 401(k) is pre-tax, meaning that for what you contribute up to the limit, your income for tax purposes goes down.

IRAs, on the other hand, have nothing to do with your employer. You have to sign up for one yourself through a bank or brokerage. Traditional IRAs have a similar tax advantage to 401(k) plans, but a lower contribution limit ($5,500).


So, how exactly does a credit score work?

There are five main factors to your credit score.

1)The first is payment history, which is a record of whether or not you’re paying your debts on time.

2)The second largest component is how much you owe, or “credit utilization.” Large balances, at or near your credit limit, hurt your credit score.

3)The third is how long you’ve had credit.

4)There’s also what’s known as the credit mix, which accounts for only 10% of the score.

5)And finally there’s “new credit,” which is a little more vague, but it’s basically bad to open a bunch of different lines of credit in a short time period.


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Vegetarians: 8 Protein Packed Meals To Shut Up The Meat Heads

If only you had a dime for how many times you get asked, “do you even get enough protein bro?” (And yes, they’ll even call you ladies bro). Although it’s an extremely annoying question, it is super important to keep in mind that your protein intake is vital in maintaining your strength and high performance ability. If you’ve crossed meat out of your diet for the long haul, below are 8 protein packed meal ideas to keep you healthy and strong… AND under 400 calories. Take that meat heads!

1. Salsa Verde Lentil Tacos With Mango-Pomegranate Pico

Two tacos = 389 calories and 15.9 grams of protein. Nom nom nom.

Get the recipe here, via Ambitious Kitchen

2. Spinach and Sun-Dried Tomato Omelet Sandwich

Skip your regular drive-thru breakfast sandwich — this guy’s 149 calories and packs 22.8 grams of protein.

Get the recipe here, via The Healthy Foodie.

3. Cheesy Black Bean Stuffed Sweet Potatoes With Poached Eggs

365 calories, 19 grams of protein, and so much cheesy goodness.

Get the recipe here, via How Sweet It Is.

4. Kale, Chickpea, and Fennel Salad With Orange Vinaigrette

The perfect packed lunch = 398 calories and 22.1 grams of protein.

Get the recipe here, via BuzzFeed’s 2015 Clean Eating Challenge.

5. Baked Zucchini Fritters

Each fritter has only 89 calories and 7 grams of protein, so treat yo’self to a nice stack.

Get the recipe here, via My Purple Spoon

6. Roasted Fennel, Asparagus, and Red Onions with Parmesan and Hard-Boiled Eggs

This one is a little over, at 446 calories, but with the 33.5 grams of protein it packs, it’s worth it.
Get the recipe here, via BuzzFeed’s 2015 Clean Eating Challenge.

7. Blackberry Yogurt Parfait

314 calories and a whopping 30.1 grams of protein. Gooood morning.

Get the recipe here, via BuzzFeed’s 2015 Clean Eating Challenge.

8. Cream of Mushroom and Wild Rice Soup

Each bowl has 180 calories and 16.6 grams of protein.

Get the recipe here, via The Healthy Foodie.


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